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Bachelor host Osher Günsberg’s swipe at Dutton over Voice ‘division’

Nathan SchmidtNCA NewsWire
Media identity Osher Gusberg on Q+A.
Camera IconMedia identity Osher Gusberg on Q+A. Credit: ABC, Supplied / ABC

Television personality Osher Gunsberg has taken a swipe at Liberal leader Peter Dutton during a tense exchange over the Voice referendum on ABC’s Q+A.

The panel, which included singer Anthony Callea and LGBTQ advocate Todd Fernando, were asked what the future was for Aboriginal activism following the vote.

Liberal party women’s advocate Charlotte Mortlock said that after a “divisive year there is work to do to ... really unite”, before the Bachelor host interjected.

Media identity Osher Gusberg on Q+A. Picture : Supplied / ABC
Camera IconOsher Gusberg on Q+A questioned whether Peter Dutton was committed to ‘uniting’ Australia. Credit: ABC, Supplied / ABC

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Todd Fernando, Charlotte Mortlock and Osher Ginsberg discussing Peter Dutton. Picture : ABC
Camera IconNationals staffer Charlotte Mortlock said that after a “divisive year there is work to do to ... really unite”. Credit: ABC

Mr Gunsberg questioned the former SkyNews host on whether the opposition leader was really committed to “uniting the country” following the referendum,

“Do you truly believe that? Do you truly believe that Dutton wants to unite us? Hand on your heart,” Mr Günsberg asked, before Ms Mortlock responded “yes”.

The TV host went on to add: “I just care about the why. Why do you believe he wants to? If you tell me the why, I will believe you, but I don’t believe he really wants to.”

Ms Mortlock replied she “absolutely believed” Mr Dutton and Indigenous Australians spokeswoman Jacinta Nampijinpa Price wanted a united Australia, but with different methods.

Outgoing Victorian LGBTIQA+ Commissioner Dr Todd Fernando and media personality Osher Gunsberg on Q+A. Picture: ABC
Camera IconOutgoing Victorian LGBTIQA+ Commissioner Dr Todd Fernando questioned what more Aboriginal people needed to do. ABC Credit: ABC

In response, Mr Fernando, a Kalarievman, questioned what more Aboriginal people needed to do after three decades “to show Australia around what we wanted”.

“I think most of us on the panel are doing well, are doing fine, but the one community who actually needed support, actually needed a Voice,” Mr Fernando said.

Australians overwhelmingly rejected a referendum to enshrine an Indigenous Voice in the Constitution, with all six states voting against the proposal at the referendum on October 14.

Originally published as Bachelor host Osher Günsberg’s swipe at Dutton over Voice ‘division’

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