Call for a dedicated truck road

Geoff VivianGeraldton Guardian
Geraldton mayor Shane Van Styn at a container yard known informally as the Bull Ring. He wants Rudds Gully Road and either Edward or Goulds Road upgraded to accommodate road trains.
Camera IconGeraldton mayor Shane Van Styn at a container yard known informally as the Bull Ring. He wants Rudds Gully Road and either Edward or Goulds Road upgraded to accommodate road trains. Credit: The Geraldton Guardian, Geoff Vivian The Geraldton Guardian

Geraldton’s mayor, Shayne Van Styn, gave a detailed response to a call for a dedicated road train assembly and truckies’ rest area in Geraldton after drivers told The Geraldton Guardian it was an urgent safety need.

“Trying to negate the need to break down is a safer and a more efficient solution,” Mr Van Styn said.

He made this remark after Main Roads spokesman Dean Roberts told the Guardian there were no immediate plans or funding to develop road train assembly areas or additional rest stops in Geraldton.

Mr Roberts said his Department was considering “suitable sites” as part of future freight-related projects such as the Heavy Vehicle Outer Bypass and the Northampton Bypass.

Mr Van Styn said council preferred an inner bypass that would have northbound trucks turn up Rudds Gully Road to Narngulu via Edward or Goulds Road which would be upgraded.

“It won’t be a waste of money because you have got to upgrade Rudds Gully Road anyway,” he said.

“Until such time as a bypass is delivered, a dedicated road train break down area in Narngulu would be a welcome addition to our transport infrastructure.”

Mr Van Styn said council wanted this “inner bypass” to continue and meet North West Coastal Highway at Webberton using a section of new road, but was yet to decide which route to take.

He expected it would cost about $40 million.

“This will facilitate road trains moving around most of Geraldton without the need to break down, however, we believe that the Northampton bypass is a priority when it comes to road train traffic,” he said.

“If you are driving a triple road train and breaking down, it’s because you can’t go north of Geraldton.

“You can’t send a triple up North West Coastal Highway without a permit — it forces the need to break down which is a freight inefficiency.”

Mr Van Styn said the council also wanted a $230 million dedicated trucking road to be created between Utukarra and Webberton Roads and parallel to North West Coastal Highway.

This would be separated from the light vehicle road by a median strip.

Get the latest news from thewest.com.au in your inbox.

Sign up for our emails