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Corella habitat modifications deemed unviable by City of Greater Geraldton as culling management continues

Jessica MoroneyGeraldton Guardian
Corellas have been making their presence known in Geraldton.
Camera IconCorellas have been making their presence known in Geraldton. Credit: Geoff Vivian/The Geraldton Guardian

Pesky corellas continue to wreak havoc in the City of Greater Geraldton but the council CEO says there’s “evidence of a reduction in numbers”.

The city evaluated the effectiveness of removing roost trees and making a site out of the CBD more attractive for corellas as part of its five-year corella management program but found they were impractical and would not go ahead with them.

“Given the complexities of the corellas’ roosting patterns and movements, the city has not deemed it viable or in the community’s interest to remove any trees,” city CEO Ross McKim said.

“With a good harvest and plenty of water sources, the local environment offers boundless options for corellas to roost, so the possibility of making a site ‘more attractive’ than another is also not a viable option.”

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Loud screeching, stripped trees and damaged infrastructure are some of the impacts these declared pests are having on Greater Geraldton.

Corellas have been stripping paint from the asbestos gutters of the Masonic Hall in Augustus Street for at least a week.
Picture: Geoff Vivian The Geraldton Guardian
Camera IconCorellas have been stripping paint from the asbestos gutters of the Masonic Hall in Augustus Street for at least a week. Credit: Geoff Vivian/The Geraldton Guardian

Mr McKim said the city had been trying to control corella numbers even before the management program was established in 2019.

He said the strategy had worked to reduce corella numbers and infrastructure damage in the CBD.

“Two years ago it was identified that corellas were massing in Mullewa and Walkaway prior to reaching Geraldton,” he said.

“We have seen a visible reduction in numbers of corellas during that time.”

The city could not provide details relating to the culling of birds, but Mr McKim said its “effectiveness is continually monitored”.

“The use of gas guns to scare the birds and culling are part of the management framework. What works one year may not necessarily work the next year,” he said.

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