Food and garden waste recycling trial to start soon

Geraldton Guardian
“Food organic and garden organic material is a valuable commodity which should not be dumped in landfill.” - Shane Van Styne, City of Greater Geraldton. File image.
Camera Icon“Food organic and garden organic material is a valuable commodity which should not be dumped in landfill.” - Shane Van Styne, City of Greater Geraldton. File image. Credit: Image Source/Getty Images

A kerbside collection trial for organic food and garden waste will start in Geraldton next month, in an effort to reduce the amount of waste being dumped at the landfill site by up to half.

Mayor Shane Van Styn said in a statement the trial will also give the City of Greater Geraldton an opportunity to perfect the composting process.

“We are serious about reducing waste, and that’s why we are implementing realistic and worthwhile recycling initiatives,” he said.

“Food organic and garden organic material is a valuable commodity which should not be dumped in landfill, which is why we are going to collect it and process it locally to make compost for the City and community to use.”

He said the city was trying to take a realistic approach to recycling, as all recycling facilities in WA relied on Asian markets to recycle the material, while China has placed restrictions on accepting foreign waste.

That’s led to a “nationwide crisis” in recycling that requires local authorities to take steps to keep recycling material out of landfill, he said.

Lime-green “FOGO” bins with lids will be sent to 500 randomly selected houses in nine suburbs in the city ahead of the first collections.

City staff will also hold ‘street meets’ over the next two weeks in those neighbourhoods, to answer questions and give out kitchen caddies to people who are participating in the trial.

According to the City, WA recycling facilities only sort, bale and ship the material to Asian markets for processing.

“Due to current recycling limitations, we are taking a considered approach to try and ensure we give our community realistic options to recycle and ensure that it ends up being recycled and not in landfill,” Mr Van Styn said.

“We don’t think it’s sustainable to increase rates to introduce a recycling program that is in actual fact, just ending up in landfill.”

For more information on the food and garden organic waste trial or to find out where to recycle, visit the City of Greater Geraldton website.

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