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Geraldton councillors vote to replace shattered Horizon sculpture with near identical version

Michael RobertsGeraldton Guardian
Geraldton residents like Lorraine Morton were shocked to find the sculpture missing earlier this month.
Camera IconGeraldton residents like Lorraine Morton were shocked to find the sculpture missing earlier this month. Credit: Michael Roberts/Geraldton Guardian/Geraldton Guardi

The City of Greater Geraldton plans to buy an exact replica of the shattered Horizon sculpture and place it in the same spot it broke earlier this month.

Geraldton residents have been mourning the loss of the popular public artwork since it suddenly fell apart on the Beresford Foreshore at the end of a 38C day on December 4.

Police didn’t charge anyone over the sudden break, with the City saying it likely shattered due to a combination of warm weather and an existing weakness in the structure caused by vandalism.

The shattered pieces of the Horizon sculpture on Geraldton's Beresford foreshore.
Camera IconThe shattered pieces of the Horizon sculpture on Geraldton's Beresford foreshore. Credit: City of Greater Geraldton

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Horizon was installed in 2019 at a cost of about $100,000 by Sydney-based artist Lucy Humphrey, who first showed off the artwork at Sculpture by the Sea.

Earlier this year the City spent $8000 to repair cracks that had appeared on the 1.5m acrylic sphere which holds 1800 litres of water, attributing the damage to youth who used gings.

At Tuesday night’s ordinary council meeting, councillors unanimously voted to find an identical replacement and investigate the cost of installing CCTV in the area.

Mayor Shan Van Styn said the council would make a final decision on replacing the “wildly popular” piece at the mid-year budget review after getting a quote from the artist.

“I think it’s important we get on the front foot and resolve this situation as soon as possible,” he said.

“It’s one of the best things that has been achieved in terms of public art.

“I want to send a signal that we aren’t just going to sit there and be victim to people that might choose to take away nice things from us.”

The sculpture when it was first installed in 2019.
Camera IconThe sculpture when it was first installed in 2019. Credit: Geoff Vivian/The Geraldton Guardian

The City has lodged an insurance claim over the loss.

Cr Mike Reymond said public art was a measure of happiness in the community.

“To me it’s a great outcome if we get a new one,” he said.

“I will be making suggestions at our next mid-year budget review to put more money into the public art budget.”

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