Kalbarri and Binnu students whose schools were damaged by Seroja started Term 2 off-campus

Phoebe PinGeraldton Guardian
Binnu Primary School students have been learning in the Binnu Town Hall following cyclone Seroja
Camera IconBinnu Primary School students have been learning in the Binnu Town Hall following cyclone Seroja

Kalbarri and Binnu students have not let cyclone Seroja disrupt their studies, with temporary classrooms set up this week.

Most Mid West students were able to return to their normal classrooms for the start of term two this week, but students from Binnu Primary School and Kalbarri District High School will be learning off-campus until the sites can reopen safely.

Kalbarri District High School principal Michael Ostaszewskyj said the response from the community to help students continue classes in the wake of cyclone Seroja had been “uplifting”.

“Everyone has come together to do all they can to help and make sure our students could start learning on the first day of term two this week, which has been a remarkable effort,” he said.

“Our students are currently learning in the Kalbarri Allen Centre and St Mark’s Church with supplied resources while our school is cleared and the damage repaired, and the support provided to students, staff and their families has been terrific.”

Kalbarri District High School students have been learning in the Kalbarri Allen Centre this week.
Camera IconKalbarri District High School students have been learning in the Kalbarri Allen Centre this week.

Binnu Primary School principal Helen Barnes said the school had been “overwhelmed” by the community’s support since the cyclone.

“To have our students learning on the first day of term two at the Binnu Town Hall was the result of a huge co-ordinated effort,” she said.

“Department staff in the Mid West and Perth and our school staff, parents and community on the ground in Binnu have been outstanding in making arrangements so we were ready for the continuation of teaching and learning and for pastoral care.”

Ms Barnes said students had settled in well to their new routine. “The children have returned to school in a familiar environment and they had a great first day back,” she said.

“They’re happy, calm and settled and are ecstatic to be back together, learning together.

“We also have the support of a school psychologist, chaplain and pastoral care available if needed.”

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