The power is within us all

Peter FiorenzaGeraldton Guardian
Beresford foreshore, pictured in October 2018 before shade sails were installed.
Camera IconBeresford foreshore, pictured in October 2018 before shade sails were installed. Credit: The Geraldton Guardian

OPINION

Recently I was listening to an interview on the radio with a person who had returned to Geraldton after a 30-year absence.

She spoke about how the place had changed so much, with the foreshore showing the biggest alterations.

She went on to say she believed the foreshore development had actually transformed Geraldton, and not just physically.

“There seems to be a real positive attitude around the place, because people seem to have somewhat of a sense of pride in their city and therefore feel good about themselves,” she said.

It’s interesting to note the person interviewed suggested she thought people in Geraldton seemed to have a good outlook because they liked where they lived.

I tend to agree.

I believe there are not that many places in Australia, or the world, for that matter, that have a waterfront that mirrors what we have.

And I’m also a big advocate of environment being a contributor to someone’s happiness and general health.

By this, I mean I believe we are the product of our environment, both from a physical and mental aspect.

However, the key is the effort put in by the individual in respect to creating a conducive environment.

For instance, in my job, I am conscious to create an atmosphere in my classroom that works for the students I have in there, along with myself.

So I try to surround myself with the things I like such as pictures of famous tennis players, West Coast team posters and the like.

Because these things make me happy, I therefore have a happier disposition and try to pass this happiness on in the delivery of my lesson, but it’s a little more than altering the decor.

Mindset is such a powerful tool in generating mood.

When I first started out in the workforce at 18, I was fortunate enough to attend a presentation aimed at surviving in the workplace.

One gem I took away from the talk involved ignoring the negative attitudes of others.

“If a colleague at work is having a bad day, and also treating you badly, don’t let it take hold and come into your world,” I remember the person speaking saying.

“Say to yourself ‘OK, they might be having a bad day, but they are not going to affect mine’.”

Now, I’ve never forgotten that, and I reckon it has served me well.

It is indeed us, as individuals, who have all the power when it comes to being happy.

We just need to keep reminding ourselves about that.

- Peter Fiorenza is the host of SHL Sunday 10am - noon on Radio MAMA.

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