Rodeo lovers enjoy 39th edition of Nullarbor Muster

Headshot of Elena Morabito
Elena MorabitoKalgoorlie Miner
Brandon Van-Zye during the novice bull riding event at the 2022 Nullarbor Muster in Rawlinna.
Camera IconBrandon Van-Zye during the novice bull riding event at the 2022 Nullarbor Muster in Rawlinna. Credit: Amber Lilley/Kalgoorlie Miner

Rodeo lovers on Friday rolled out their swags, lit fires and settled in for a weekend of fun at the 39th edition of the Nullarbor Muster.

The festivities were hosted at Rawlinna, a town half way between Kalgoorlie-Boulder and the South Australian border, with punters coming from far and wide to attend the bull rides, gymkhana events and skeet shoot.

Will Vaisey and Angus Brown at the 2022 Nullarbor Muster in Rawlinna
Camera IconWill Vaisey and Angus Brown at the 2022 Nullarbor Muster in Rawlinna Credit: Amber Lilley/Kalgoorlie Miner

Attendees gathered around the arena as the sun set, the sweet smell of donuts filling the air as bull riders attempted to hang on for dear life for longer than eight seconds while swinging their hand in the air.

Some were more daring than others, sporting Akubras, with the more cautious wearing helmets to protect them from the inevitable fall.

The Iron Man and Iron Woman events followed, with competitors sculling a beer before weaving a tyre through posts, while attempting to keep their dinner down.

As the cold air engulfed the campgrounds, muster-goers stayed warm by dancing to the sound of the K7 band and taking advantage of the $5 beers.

Rodeo ring lights went on as the sun went down at the 2022 Nullarbor Muster in Rawlinna
Camera IconRodeo ring lights went on as the sun went down at the 2022 Nullarbor Muster in Rawlinna Credit: Amber Lilley/Kalgoorlie Miner

As the sun rose on Saturday morning, a sea of people wearing chequered shirts and their best boots filled the campgrounds, eager to munch on a bacon and egg roll before attending the day’s events.

It began with gymkhanas, including the popular barrel races and RFDS flutter, and attendees later trying their hand at arm wrestling in the shed.

The much-awaited broncos and bull rides were the final event of the day, with jillaroos and jackaroos receiving roars from the crowd if they were able to stay on board the beasts.

Nullarbor Muster attendees Vicki and Steven Findlay said they were accustomed to musters, having attended the Mullewa and Kununurra events.

Ms Findlay said they had been following the musters for some time, but had not been able to attend the Nullarbor Muster until 2022 because of COVID.

Lottie James riding Dasiy during the junior competitions at the 2022 Nullarbor Muster in Rawlinna
Camera IconLottie James riding Dasiy during the junior competitions at the 2022 Nullarbor Muster in Rawlinna Credit: Amber Lilley/Kalgoorlie Miner

Mr Findlay said he kept coming back to musters for the friendly atmosphere.

“I think it’s the friendliness, everyone’s free without being too free … we normally have our grandkids with us but not here, it’s probably too far out here,” Mr Findlay said.

The couple said they were from Geraldton, and had spent two nights in Kalgoorlie-Boulder before arriving at Rawlinna.

The Findlays said the barrel race was their favourite event, but the broncos and bulls were also notable.

“I like the barrel racing and the kids too. I think they’re skilled, I think they’re great,” Ms Findlay said.

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