Princess Beatrice uses Geraldton wax in royal wedding bouquet

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Ben AndersonThe West Australian
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VideoPictures have been shared of Princess Beatrice wearing one of her grandmother Queen Elizabeth II's old Sir Norman Hartnell gowns for her top-secret quarantine wedding on Friday.

While the world's attention may have been focused on the vintage dress and tiara, Princess Beatrice’s wedding ensemble had tiny touch of Western Australia unnoticed by most royal watchers.

Queen Elizabeth’s granddaughter married businessman Edoardo Mozzi at The Royal Chapel of All Saints at Royal Lodge, Windsor on Sunday.

Photos of the private ceremony show the beaming bride clutching a colourful bouquet of porcelain ivory spray roses, Pink O’hara garden roses and Geraldton wax flowers.

The WA wildflower is favoured for bouquets due to its showy blooms and longevity.

Princess Beatrice and Mr Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi celebrated their wedding with the Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh
Camera IconPrincess Beatrice and Mr Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi celebrated their wedding with the Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh Credit: Benjamin Wheeler

However, it has one other feature that may have sealed its spot in the royal wedding.

Geraldton wax is a type of myrtle, a flower that has long association with the British royal family.

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert’s eldest daughter, also named Victoria, had myrtle in her wedding bouquet in 1885.

Myrtle also featured in the bouquets of the Duchess of Cambridge and the Queen herself.

Geraldton wax flowers featured in the wedding bouquet of Princess Beatrice.
Camera IconGeraldton wax flowers featured in the wedding bouquet of Princess Beatrice. Credit: Benjamin Wheeler

Gardening expert Charlie Albone said he would expect sales of Geraldton wax to increase in the UK.

“It adds a lovely light touch to an otherwise traditional bouquet,” he said.

Princess Beatrice’s bouquet was later placed on the tomb of the Unknown Warrior in Westminster Abbey as a tribute to all Commonwealth soldiers — including Australians — who died in war.

Royal biographer Penny Junor told News Corp the Queen’s attendance at the wedding was the best gift that Princess Beatrice could have received.

“Beatrice has every right to be happy and it was lovely that the Queen and Prince Philip were able to be present - that is a very important endorsement for her,” she said.

Princess Beatrice's wedding bouquet in Westminster Abbey in London which, like those of other Royal brides, is traditionally placed on the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior.
Camera IconPrincess Beatrice's wedding bouquet in Westminster Abbey in London which, like those of other Royal brides, is traditionally placed on the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior. Credit: Yui Mok/PA

“I’m very pleased for her that she was able to have her wedding, even in private, I don’t think it would have been appropriate to do anything more elaborate.

“She’s in love and who can deny her a chance at happiness.”

Princess Beatrice wore a vintage Norman Hartnell dress that she was given by the Queen.

The dress was made from Peau De Soie taffeta in shades of ivory, trimmed with ivory Duchess satin, with organza sleeves. It was encrusted with diamanté and had a geometric chequered bodice.

The Queen first wore the dress to the premiere of Lawrence of Arabiain 1962 and later at the opening of Parliament and a state dinner in Rome.

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