Winter Olympics: Australia’s bronze medallist Tess Coady reveals she competed with a broken ankle

Headshot of Catherine Healey
Catherine HealeyThe West Australian
VideoTess Coady reveals extent of Beijing 2022 injury scare

Australia’s bronze medallist Tess Coady refused to let injury end her Olympic dream for a second time, revealing she competed with a broken ankle in Beijing.

Coady’s hopes for the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics came crashing down when she tore her ACL in the days leading up to the international event.

Speaking to 7Sport on Saturday, Coady said she was determined to make it out on the snow this Olympics, despite her injury.

“I ended up fracturing (my ankle) a little bit, a tiny fracture,” she said.

“I did it my last run of practice before (qualifying).

“I was going back up the lift like, ‘Oh my god... nup this isn’t going to happen again’.

“The Australian medical team just went to the end of the earth to help get me all good for finals.”

Coady, the youngest Australian to win a Winter Olympics medal, said she pushed through the pain to reach the finals.

“I sort of bit my lip before I dropped in so it would be less painful,” she conceded.

“I made it through and made it to the final.”

The 21-year-old claimed Australia’s first medal of the 2022 Winter Olympics, and the first ever medal for an Australian in slopeside.

Coady pulled off an incredible final run to put her best score of 84.15, earning her bronze in a dramatic final at the Secret Garden Olympic Slopestyle.

She finished behind New Zealander Zoi Sadowski-Synnott (92.88) and American Julia Marino (87.68), who won gold and silver respectively.

Despite her ankle injury, Coady again competed in Beijing where she bravely qualified for the Big Air final.

Coady was in third spot after the first round with an impressive score of 85.00 but bombed out of contention in the remaining two jumps as she attempted a backside 1060, to finish ninth.

VideoScary moment dooms Aussie snowboarder Tess Coady's medal run.

“Making two finals is so big for me and I’m so incredibly stoked about that.

“I’m really keen when I reset to get back in to it and keep working hard.

“I love progressing in the sport, it’s so exciting, and trying new tricks and scaring yourself - it’s the best part of it.”

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