This is our wangga : Learn about some of the rich First Nations’ languages from across the Mid West

Geraldton Guardian
Dancers from Star Foundation (from left) Katlynn Nauer, 12, Shaeleigh Robinson, 12, and Alecia Zerafa, 14.
Camera IconDancers from Star Foundation (from left) Katlynn Nauer, 12, Shaeleigh Robinson, 12, and Alecia Zerafa, 14. Credit: City of Greater Geraldton/City of Greater Geraldton

Ever wondered how to introduce yourself in one of the languages spoken by our First Nations’ communities in the Mid West?

To mark NAIDOC Week, the Geraldton Guardian worked with the Irra Wangga Language Centre to come up with a common phrase guide for three languages traditionally used across the region.

Learning a couple of words in each language is a great way to celebrate culture and keep traditional languages alive in the community.

If you are not sure of the pronunciation of a word, don’t be afraid to ask someone who does.

WAJARRI

(Traditionally spoken across the Murchison Shire

in the Mid West)

Nyinda barndi? How are you? (literally translated to “you good?”)

Guwa, ngatha barndi Yes, I’m good.

Nganajungu ini My name is ...

Urdama nhangaya! See you later!

Tharlirrang Tallering Peak, an important site.

BADIMAYA

(Traditionally spoken from Dalwallinu to

Mount Magnet in the Mid West)

Nhundu buranymarda? How are you?

(literally translated to “you good?”)

Guwa, ngadhu buranymarda. Yes, I’m good.

Nganangu ini My name is ...

Yurda-yurda! (See you) later!

Gagarlagu Kirkalocka Station.

WARRIYANGGA

(Traditionally spoken along the upper Lyons River in the Upper Gascoyne)

Wayirru nhurra gupina? How are you? (literally translated to “you good?”)

Ngatha bagalya I’m good.

... nganaju yini My name is ...

Maarru nhanyara! See you later!

Mithirring Lyons River, an important feature.

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