Federal officers raid High Wycombe home after woman allegedly submitted false hardship claims to access superannuation payments worth thousands

Phil HickeyThe West Australian
VideoA 34-year-old High Wycombe woman has been charged with allegedly submitting multiple false claims to gain early access to superannuation savings, under a scheme designed to assist members of the community who are in severe financial hardship.

A High Wycombe woman has been charged with allegedly submitting multiple false claims to gain early access to superannuation savings, following a raid on her home on Friday by federal officers.

The 34-year-old woman is the fourth person to be charged by the Australian Federal Police anti-fraud Taskforce Iris.

Her arrest follows a referral from the Australian Taxation Office-led Serious Financial Crime Taskforce.

Police will allege the woman submitted several false hardship claims on behalf of other people to access superannuation payments of up to $10,000 each.

It will be alleged that after successfully receiving a hardship payment from her own superannuation account, she transferred the remaining balance into another fund and made another hardship application.

Taskforce Iris investigators executed a search warrant at the woman’s home on Friday where they seized several documents, $1750 cash, ink-based business identification and certification stamps, and electronic devices.

The 34-year-old woman is the fourth person to be charged by the Australian Federal Police anti-fraud Taskforce Iris.
Camera IconThe 34-year-old woman is the fourth person to be charged by the Australian Federal Police anti-fraud Taskforce Iris. Credit: Australian Federal Police

The woman will face Perth Magistrates Court next month on four Commonwealth related charges.

The hardship provision pre-dates the temporary support measures introduced by the Federal Government because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Applicants must meet certain criteria to access a payment of up to $10,000 from their superannuation account.

But AFP Deputy Commissioner Brett Pointing said the agency was committed to identifying anyone trying to exploit the system.

“Fraud is far from a victimless crime and false applications for these packages undermine the system and can delay access to people who genuinely need help,” he said.

Get the latest news from thewest.com.au in your inbox.

Sign up for our emails